Author Topic: Celebrity Passings 2018  (Read 5270 times)

Monkey D Luffy

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Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #90 on: July 25, 2018, 12:04:46 pm »
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After a battle in the hospital following what was reported as a massive stroke, Jon Schnepp passed away yesterday. He was 51 years old.

Having been blessed with his presence on several occasions, this feels like a heavy blow, but I am thankful for what he’s brought into this world. He was an absolutely delightful person to be around and will be missed greatly.

While many comic fans will remember Schnepp as the director of the phenomenal documentary The Death of Superman Lives: What Happened? and as a regular on ********** “Movie Talk”, he’s a legend for his work on Cartoon Network/Adult Swim’s “Metalocalypse”. He not only directed the majority of episodes, but he’s also responsible for the look of all of the members in Dethklok.

A little-known fact, but he also co-directed the pilot for “Upright Citizens Brigade” for Comedy Central, and according to ****, was an editor on numerous episodes of Cartoon Network’s “Space Ghost: Coast to Coast”. Lastly, he entered the horror arena with his “W is for WTF?” short in The ABCs of Death.

We send all of our thoughts and prayers to Jon’s partner Holly, as well as his mother Miriam, his father David, his sister Deborah, and all of his other family and friends. He will be greatly missed, but never forgotten.

Very sad
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #91 on: August 06, 2018, 07:10:14 am »
Charlotte Rae, Mrs. Garrett on Facts of Life and Diff’rent Strokes, dies at 92

Charlotte Rae, best known as wise and lovable house mother Mrs. Garrett on The Facts of Life, died Sunday at her home in Los Angeles, representatives for the actress confirmed. She was 92.

Rae revealed she’d been diagnosed with bone cancer at the end of April 2017. “Last Monday, I found out I have bone cancer,” she said in a statement. “About seven years ago, I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer — which is a miracle that they found it because usually, it’s too late. My mother, sister, and my uncle died of pancreatic cancer. After six months of chemotherapy, I was cancer-free. I lost my hair, but I had beautiful wigs. Nobody ever knew. So now, at the age of 91, I have to make up my mind. I’m not in any pain right now. I’m feeling so terrific and so glad to be above ground. Now I have to figure out whether I want to go have treatment again or opt for life.”

She continued to share her decision, “I love life. I’ve had a wonderful one already … I’ve had a great life, but I have so many wonderful things happening. I’d like to choose life. I’m grateful for the life I’ve already had.”

RIP
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #92 on: August 06, 2018, 08:29:02 am »
Very talented lady. She will be missed. RIP Charlotte Rae.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #93 on: August 13, 2018, 11:49:32 am »
Terrible terrible news! Jim 'the Anvil' Neidhart has died at the age of 63! I loved that guy as he was a great character! Part of the great Hart Foundation tag team and married into the Hart family and father! Truly a great loss! RIP Anvil!
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #94 on: August 16, 2018, 10:51:28 am »
As a Detroiter who grew up listening to the local oldies station, including all of the Motown classics, this one stings like hell.  Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, has passed away at 76.  Please be sure to show her some R-E-S-P-E-C-T.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #95 on: August 16, 2018, 10:56:43 am »
It is a very sad day as Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul, and one of the greatest voices of all time has passed away at age 76 after a battle with cancer. Aretha faced the end with tremendous courage and said farewell to many friends over the last few days. She was one of the best who ever lived, and if no one minds, I'm going into the bathroom to cry. RIP Aretha.
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Monkey D Luffy

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Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #96 on: August 16, 2018, 02:07:00 pm »
It is a very sad day as Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul, and one of the greatest voices of all time has passed away at age 76 after a battle with cancer. Aretha faced the end with tremendous courage and said farewell to many friends over the last few days. She was one of the best who ever lived, and if no one minds, I'm going into the bathroom to cry. RIP Aretha.

Dam that sucks
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #97 on: August 16, 2018, 10:51:58 pm »
And just like that another singer has died today, although one not nearly as famous as Aretha. In fact I never heard of her. But Jill Janis, lead singer of Huntress has died of an apparent suicide at age 43. RIP Jill.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #98 on: August 17, 2018, 06:24:11 am »
As a Detroiter who grew up listening to the local oldies station, including all of the Motown classics, this one stings like hell.  Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, has passed away at 76.  Please be sure to show her some R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

As one of my local DJs was very quick to point out (And rather angrily, at that), Aretha Franklin was never part of Motown. She was part of several labels over the years, J.V.B, Columbia, Atlantic, Arista, and RCA - but was NEVER part of Motown. Yes, even though she lived in Detroit. A very common misconception that I didn't know until maybe 2 hours ago.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #99 on: August 17, 2018, 05:18:28 pm »
As a Detroiter who grew up listening to the local oldies station, including all of the Motown classics, this one stings like hell.  Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, has passed away at 76.  Please be sure to show her some R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

As one of my local DJs was very quick to point out (And rather angrily, at that), Aretha Franklin was never part of Motown. She was part of several labels over the years, J.V.B, Columbia, Atlantic, Arista, and RCA - but was NEVER part of Motown. Yes, even though she lived in Detroit. A very common misconception that I didn't know until maybe 2 hours ago.
My whole life has been a lie.  Damn, I never knew that.  Come to think of it, I don't remember seeing any Franklin memorabilia when I visited Hitsville U.S.A., so it all makes sense now.

Over to some more news...

Quote
In some incredibly sad news for the world of Pokémon, it’s been announced that Unsho Ishizuka, the voice actor for the iconic Professor Oak in the original Japanese anime, has passed away.

The Pokémon anime series, which started in Japan in 1997, was staple viewing for every child of the 90s/early 2000s, and we all remember the adventures of Ash, Pikachu, Misty and Brock like they just happened yesterday.

Ishizuka isn’t just known for his role as Professor Oak, as he also featured in Dragon Ball as the voice of Mr. Satan, as well as Heihachi Mishima in the Tekken series.

As for his role in Pokémon he didn’t just voice Professor Oak. He also narrated the Japanese series and even voiced a few of the Pokémon themselves, including Onix.

Ishizuka’s back-catalogue of iconic characters is an impressive one, reaching all the way from Cowboy Bebop to SAO spin-off series, Sword Art Online Alternative Gun Gale Online.

According to a report from Japanese website, **********, Ishizuka passed away after a battle with esophageal cancer, aged just 68.

Fans of Ishizuka’s work are lamenting the loss of a true legend in the world of anime.

******* is being flooded with tributes to the late voice actor, proving just how many lives his characters had touched.

One user *******: “Unsho Ishizuka, known for the role of Professor Oak in Pokémon, has passed away at 68.

“I enjoyed Pokémon anime with your voice as a child… Thank you for your hard work, your great work will forever remain in my heart. Rest in peace.”

Another wrote: “Oh man, that’s heartbreaking. Joseph Joestar, Mr Satan after Mr Gori passed, and of course Professor Oak. He voiced so many legendary characters. He’ll be sorely missed.”
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Tell the world I'm coming... home

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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #100 on: August 17, 2018, 10:24:05 pm »
As a Detroiter who grew up listening to the local oldies station, including all of the Motown classics, this one stings like hell.  Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, has passed away at 76.  Please be sure to show her some R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

As one of my local DJs was very quick to point out (And rather angrily, at that), Aretha Franklin was never part of Motown. She was part of several labels over the years, J.V.B, Columbia, Atlantic, Arista, and RCA - but was NEVER part of Motown. Yes, even though she lived in Detroit. A very common misconception that I didn't know until maybe 2 hours ago.

Story is that her father never trusted Berry Gordy.

Pretty easy to tell her early records aren't Motown.  James Jamerson's distinctive funky bass is absent.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #101 on: August 24, 2018, 12:07:00 pm »
Robin Leach's next tour of famous dwellings will take him above the clouds.  He passed away today at 76 (five days before his 77th birthday) after suffering a stroke on Monday.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #102 on: August 24, 2018, 02:29:23 pm »
Russ Heath, comic book artist, has passed away at age 91. Working at Timely which would become Marvel, DC, even Playboy, he was mostly known for western and war comics, co-creating 'The Haunted Tank' all the way to working on Little Annie Fanny at Playboy. RIP Russ.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #103 on: August 25, 2018, 05:58:08 am »
Two great guitarists:


Eddie Willis, one of the original members of Motown's session band , The Funk Brothers, gone at age 82.



Ed King, once of Lynyrd Skynyrd, where he co-wrote "Sweet Home Alabama." Previous to that he was part of the 60's psychedelic rock group with arguably the best band name ever, Strawberry Alarm Clock (big hit "Incense and Peppermints.") He was 68.
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Re: Celebrity Passings 2018
« Reply #104 on: August 26, 2018, 12:10:53 pm »
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Neil Simon, one of the rare late-20th century playwrights who was a brand name for plays such as “The Odd Couple” and “Barefoot in the Park,” died Sunday. He was 91.

A statement from his reps said, “Neil Simon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright, died last night at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. The cause was complications from pneumonia.”

“His wife, Elaine Joyce Simon, was at his bedside along with Mr. Simon’s daughters, Ellen Simon and Nancy Simon.”

In addition to his four Oscar nominations and 17 Tony nominations, Simon’s works brought an unsurpassed 50 Tony nominations for their actors. His competitive Tony wins came for “The Odd Couple” (best playwright) and for best play for “Lost in Yonkers” and “Biloxi Blues.”

Beginning in the 1960s, Simon could guarantee good Broadway advance sales, a rare feat for a writer. He had more than 30 plays mounted on Broadway, including four that ran simultaneously in 1966: “Sweet Charity,” “The Star-Spangled Girl,” “The Odd Couple” and “Barefoot in the Park.”

He also wrote numerous screenplays, some of them originals, some adaptations of his stage work. But he was best known as a playwright, both for his long string of Gotham shows as well as countless productions by regional and amateur theater companies, which helped him become the most-performed playwright of his era.

At a time when the legitimate theater was in decline and devoted American playwrights an endangered species, Simon stood head and shoulders above the rest. His early comedic successes, such as “The Odd Couple” and “Barefoot in the Park,” were both critically well received and financially successful, and even some critics who found him glib and formulaic could not deny his craftsmanship and the sheer volume of his output.

Simon once said that he was a disciplined writer, sitting at a typewriter for eight hours and constantly banging on the keys even if he was writing gibberish, because he needed the regularity of constantly writing.

After decades of writing comedies, he began to win more awards with his more introspective and autobiographical plays, exploring his working-class upbringing in such comedy-dramas as “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and the Tony and Pulitzer winner “Lost in Yonkers.”

Simon never much wandered from his roots. And even when his plays were geographically distant from his New York-Jewish background, the sensibility remained in the approach to comedy and the characters that inhabited his pieces. A Neil Simon comedy was as identifiable as the work of any other major American playwright, whether O’Neill, Williams or Philip Barry.

In addition to his screen adaptations of plays, he wrote original motion picture scripts including “The Goodbye Girl,” the 1972 “The Heartbreak Kid” (adapted from Bruce Jay Friedman’s story) and 1976’s “Murder by Death.” But he maintained a fervor and enthusiasm for the theater that made him unique in the era of television and film.

Simon got his start in TV, as one of the writers on “Your Show of Shows,” the landmark comedic variety show of the 1950s that starred Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca. His colleagues included Carl Reiner, Larry Gelbart and Mel Brooks.

Like George M. Cohan, whose landmark statue unites the Broadway theater district, Marvin Neil Simon was born on the Fourth of July, in the Bronx. He was dubbed Doc as a young boy — he had a habit of imitating the family doctor — and it stuck, long after people forgot his original first name, Marvin.

He and older brother Danny first began writing comedy skits when Doc was only 15. After a stint in the Army, he and Danny were reunited at Warner Bros. Danny was working in publicity and his brother in the mailroom. Simon got his BA from NYU in 1946.

Their work impressed CBS producer Goodman Ace, and he hired them to script a radio show for Robert Q. Lewis. After writing material for Phil Silvers, Jackie Gleason and Jerry Lester, Simon landed on “Your Show of Shows” as well as Phil Silvers’ shows, including the weekly comedy “Sgt. Bilko.” Simon also wrote material for Tallulah Bankhead’s 1951 show and “The Garry Moore Show.”

Tiring of the sausage factory atmosphere of collaborative TV writing, Simon struck out on his own after writing and rewriting the play “Come Blow Your Horn” about 15 times. It landed on Broadway and became his first success in 1961, earning him $1,000 a week and freedom from television.

Simon then penned the book for the Sid Caesar-starring musical “Little Me” in 1962, followed by his first major success, “Barefoot in the Park,” in 1963. The comedy became one of Broadway’s longest-running legitimate plays, with 1,532 performances, and a smash film in 1967. His next comedy, 1965’s “The Odd Couple,” would top even that success, especially as a film and a long-running TV sitcom (though Simon had no connection to the TV series); the play was revived on Broadway in 1985 with a gender switch and again in 2005. Key to Simon’s early successes was his director, Mike Nichols.

His output during the 1960s included two musical librettos, “Sweet Charity” and “Promises, Promises,” based on Federico Fellini’s “Nights of Cabiria” and Billy Wilder’s “The Apartment,” respectively. “The Star-Spangled Girl” was an attempt to break from his roots. “Plaza Suite” was a bigger hit, a trio of one-acts set in the Plaza Hotel. He would return to the format for “California Suite” and “London Suite.”

His 1969 comedy hit “The Last of the Red Hot Lovers,” about a man and the women in his life, would also set the format for 1990’s “Jake’s Women,” a play that failed to make it to Broadway. “The Gingerbread Lady” (1970) was his first attempt at more serious dramatic fare, and with less spectacular results. In the early ’70s he sought to emulate Chekov with “The Good Doctor,” and he wrote a biblical parable, “God’s Favorite.”

Audiences clamored for his more commercial fare such as “The Prisoner of Second Avenue,” “California Suite” and “The Sunshine Boys.” “Sunshine Boys,” which was an even bigger success onscreen, was written while his wife of 20 years, Joan, was dying of cancer. She was the mother of his daughters Ellen and Nancy, and the emotional devastation of that life passage and his rapid turnaround marriage to actress Marsha Mason formed the basis of his first serious-minded success, “Chapter Two,” in 1977.

Even before he began adapting his plays to the screen, Simon had written the feature comedy “After the Fox” in 1966. His first original bigscreen comedy to become a hit was “The Out-of-Towners,” which starred Jack Lemmon and Sandy Dennis.

The detective spoof “Murder by Death” followed, and his 1977 “The Goodbye Girl” won an Oscar for Richard Dreyfuss and brought wife Mason a nomination.

Simon’s screen career was fostered by producer Ray Stark, who shepherded many of the playwright’s stage comedies and original works to the screen.

Simon had won a Tony for “The Odd Couple” in 1965, several of his plays and musicals had been Tony nominated, and he was worth more than $10 million, but the ease of his popular appeal worked against him critically. The turnaround began with “Brighton Beach Memoirs” in 1983. The autobiographical drama of his adolescence brought Simon his first taste of serious acclaim. It was followed by the more comedic but equally pungent “Biloxi Blues,” a coming-of age-comedy about his uneventful Army days. Like “Brighton Beach,” it starred Matthew Broderick as Eugene, Simon’s alter ego. And it won Simon another Tony for best play in 1985. The trilogy was completed with “Broadway Bound,” about his early career in the theater.

In 1991 his play “Lost in Yonkers,” another serio-comedy, brought him his highest accolade — a Pulitzer Prize for drama — as well as a third Tony award.

After the film version of “Biloxi Blues,” his movies failed to ignite. Similarly, such plays as “Jake’s Women” were a miss, and “Rumors” and “Laughter on the 23rd Floor,” about his TV comedy writing days, falled to catch on.

But by then Simon was the most popular and frequently performed playwright of his day. His 1997 autobiography “The Play Goes On: A Memoir” was a success.

Simon penned an original screenplay sequel to “The Odd Couple.” The 1998 film reunited the stars reunited the stars of the original film, Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon; Matthau had created the role of Oscar Madison on Broadway.

Simon’s most recent new works to play Broadway received generally mixed notices, with critics finding 2000 offering “The Dinner Party” an intriguing but unsuccessful detour into darker territory and 2001 play “45 Seconds from Broadway” considered sweet-natured but slim.

The past few decades saw TV remakes of “The Sunshine Boys,” “Plaza Suite,” “The Goodbye Girl” as well as bigscreen remakes of “The Heartbreak Kid” and “The Out of Towners,” while Broadway revived “Sweet Charity,” “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Promises, Promises.”

In 2006 he won the Mark Twain Prize for Humor, presented by the Kennedy Center; he had also received a special Tony for contributions to the theater in 1975.

Simon married five times. He is survived by his wife, actress Elaine Joyce; three daughters; three grandchildren and one great-grandson.

(Gordon Cox contributed to this report.)
« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 04:43:26 pm by InThe313 »
I'm coming home
I'm coming home
Tell the world I'm coming home
Let the rain wash away all the pain of yesterday
I know my kingdom awaits and they've forgiven my mistakes
I'm coming home, I'm coming home
Tell the world I'm coming... home