Author Topic: Sports figures deceased:  (Read 221 times)

Vicki

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Sports figures deceased:
« on: September 20, 2017, 05:41:45 pm »
We don't have this thread as we post them in Celebrity deaths, but we should have one here for sports related figures, even including wrestlers as show or not they are great athletes.

Jake LaMotta, the Raging Bull has died at age 95!
All women are lesbians at heart, my ongoing mission, to prove it.

Sanity is over-rated, but I never believed in it anyway. 

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Vicki

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2017, 02:41:17 am »
Basketball star Connie Hawkins has died at age 75!
All women are lesbians at heart, my ongoing mission, to prove it.

Sanity is over-rated, but I never believed in it anyway. 

I'll make that top 10 posters list yet! :D

I can look at myself NAKED!

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Vicki

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2017, 03:55:56 pm »
NFL Hall of Fame member Y. A. Tittle has died at age 90! RIP.
All women are lesbians at heart, my ongoing mission, to prove it.

Sanity is over-rated, but I never believed in it anyway. 

I'll make that top 10 posters list yet! :D

I can look at myself NAKED!

Founder of the Lesbian Lover's of the Multiverse

InThe313

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2017, 04:05:02 pm »
Roy Halladay, a two-time Cy Young Award-winning pitcher who retired from baseball nearly four years ago, died when his plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday. He was 40.

Halladay's ICON A5, a small, single-engine aircraft, went down around noon Tuesday off the coast of Florida, Pasco County Sheriff Chris Nocco said at a news conference.

The sheriff's office marine unit responded and found Halladay's body in shallow water near some mangroves. No survivors were found. Police said they couldn't confirm if there were additional passengers on the plane or where it was headed.

Nocco said the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

"All of us at Baseball are shocked and deeply saddened by the tragic passing of former Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay," MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. "A well-respected figure throughout the game, Roy was a fierce competitor during his 16-year career, which included eight All-Star selections, two Cy Young Awards, a perfect game and a postseason no-hitter.

"On behalf of Major League Baseball, I extend my deepest condolences to his family, including his wife, Brandy, and two sons, Ryan and Braden, his friends and countless fans, as well as the Blue Jays and Phillies organizations."

Halladay received his pilot's license several years ago and ******* photos last month of himself standing next to a new ICON A5 as part of the plane's marketing campaign.

In a story posted last month on ICON's website to promote the A5, Halladay said he had "been dreaming about flying since I was a boy but was only able to become a pilot once I retired from baseball."

In a video posted on ICON's website, Halladay said the terms of his baseball contract prevented him from having a pilot's license while playing and that his wife was originally against the idea of him getting the aircraft.

"Hard. I fought hard. I was very against it,'' Brandy Halladay said in the same video, before explaining why she eventually understood and approved of her husband's desire to have the plane. The video was removed from ******* later Tuesday.

Halladay's father was a corporate pilot.

The A5 was a newer model from ICON, based in Vacaville, California. It's a two-seat "light-sport aircraft" that can land on water. Halladay had owned his ICON A5 for less than a month and was among the first to fly it, with only about 20 in existence, according to the website for ICON Aviation.

On May 8, two ICON employees, the company's lead test pilot and the director of engineering, were killed in a crash in an A5 in Napa County, California. The NTSB report indicated the probable cause was "the pilot's failure to maintain clearance from terrain while maneuvering at a low altitude."

"We were devastated to learn that former MLB pitcher Roy Halladay died today in an accident involving an ICON A5 in the Gulf of Mexico," the company said in a statement. "We have gotten to know Roy and his family in recent months, and he was a great advocate and friend of ours. The entire ICON community would like to pass on our deepest condolences to Roy's family and friends. ICON will do everything it can to support the accident investigation going forward, and we will comment further when more information is available."

Nocco said Tuesday that Halladay was a "personal friend of our sheriff's office" and that it is a "sad day for us here in Pasco County."

"Being a pilot, flying planes, that was his passion," Nocco said. "He would talk about it, about refurbishing planes."

Halladay was an eight-time All-Star who went 203-105 with a 3.38 ERA in his 16-year career with the Blue Jays and Phillies. He threw a perfect game with the Phillies during the 2010 season. And on Oct. 6 of that year, against the Cincinnati Reds in the National League Division Series, he became only the second pitcher to throw a postseason no-hitter, joining Don Larsen, who accomplished the feat for the New York Yankees in the 1956 World Series.

In a statement, the Phillies said, "There are no words to describe the sadness that the entire Phillies family is feeling over the loss of one of the most respected human beings to ever play the game." Added team chairman David Montgomery of Halladay at a news conference later Tuesday: "All-Star pitcher. All-Star person. All-Star father and family man."

Halladay signed a one-day contract with Toronto in December 2013 so he could retire as a member of the Blue Jays, the team with which he spent the first 12 years of his career.

"The Toronto Blue Jays organization is overcome by grief with the tragic loss of one of the franchise's greatest and most respected players, but even better human being," the team said in a statement. "It is impossible to express what he has meant to this franchise, the city and its fans. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends."

Halladay won the 2003 American League Cy Young Award and went 148-76 with a 3.43 ERA in 12 seasons with the Blue Jays. He was traded to the Phillies after the 2009 season and won the NL Cy Young in 2010.

He is eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019.

In recent years, Halladay had become a mental coach for Phillies minor leaguers. Rather than work on pitching mechanics, he worked with them on the mental approach to pitching -- tutelage that some called invaluable.

Several of Halladay's former teammates and opponents offered their condolences on social media after learning about his death.

Quote
My heart hurts writing this. I can still remember the first day we met. It was 5:45am on the first day of spring training when I arrived. He was finishing his breakfast but his clothes were soaking wet. I asked if it was raining when he got in. He laughed and said “No I just finished my workout” I knew right then- he was the real deal. Thank you Roy for allowing us to witness what it takes to be the best. We will all miss you.
Chase Utley

Quote
Such a sad day. We lost a great ball player but an even better human being. Many prayers to Brandy, Ryan, & Brayden. We will miss you Roy.
Ryan Howard

"When he smiled, it could definitely light up the room," former Phillies first baseman Howard said of Halladay on SportsCenter. "He could play a trick on someone and you not see it coming. He was a selfless guy. Loved his sons, loved his sons to death. He was a very giving, open person, very down-to-earth guy."

Cole Hamels, the former Phillies left-hander, spoke about his teammate on Tuesday while at Citizens Bank Park.

"In order to be great at something, you have to have mentors, and he was one for me," Hamels said. "I watched from afar with being here and him being in Toronto. We got to see him pitch in spring training and then watching during the season; he was the greatest of that decade, he was the greatest pitcher. You wanted to watch him, see how he attacked hitters. What was he doing different, why was he so great? Then to finally play catch with him and see he had a purpose. Behind everything he did, he had a purpose.

"You have very small, short moments in life to do something great, so you have to maximize it, and he did. He made everybody better. I think that is what you noticed. Wasn't just Roy Halladay is coming into pitch. Roy Halladay brought a team with him to win. He made everyone rise up to the best of their abilities. What he did here was something special. You didn't miss those moments when he pitched. When you had Roy Halladay on the mound, you didn't miss an inning, you didn't miss a pitch. You were watching every moment."

Halladay also had a special bond with former Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz.

"Roy was one of the greatest pitchers I ever caught, and an even better person and friend," Ruiz said. "I wanted to win more for him than myself. I will miss him very much. My thoughts and prayers are with his family and loved ones and all those, like me, who truly admired him."

Other baseball players to die in plane crashes include Pittsburgh Pirates star Roberto Clemente in a relief mission from Puerto Rico, while traveling to earthquake victims in Nicaragua on New Year's Eve in 1972; Yankees catcher Thurman Munson, while piloting his own plane near his home in Canton, Ohio, in 1979; and Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle, while piloting his own plane in New York City in 2006.

Halladay was nominated several times for the Roberto Clemente Award, given by Major League Baseball to players for sportsmanship and community involvement. The Halladay Family Foundation has aided children's charities, hunger relief and animal rescue.

"Many of you know Roy as a Cy Young winner, future Hall of Famer, one of the best pitchers ever to pitch the game of baseball," Nocco said. "We know Roy as a person, as a caring husband who loved his wife, Brandy. He loved his two boys tremendously ... and we are so sad for your loss."

According to the Tampa Bay Times, Halladay had resided in Odessa, Florida, since he retired and had coached youth baseball teams there. In the spring, he was a volunteer assistant at Calvary Christian High, where his son Braden was a sophomore on the undefeated team, which won a state title.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 11:12:56 am by InThe313 »
There you go making my heart beat again
Heart beat again, heart beat again
There you go making me feel like a kid
Won't you do it and do it one time
There you go pulling me right back in
Right back in, right back in
And I know I'm never letting this go
I'm stuck on you
Whoa-oh, whoa-oh

Vicki

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2017, 04:22:44 pm »
Tragic loss. RIP Roy! :'(
All women are lesbians at heart, my ongoing mission, to prove it.

Sanity is over-rated, but I never believed in it anyway. 

I'll make that top 10 posters list yet! :D

I can look at myself NAKED!

Founder of the Lesbian Lover's of the Multiverse

InThe313

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2017, 11:35:45 am »
Dick Enberg, the Hall of Fame broadcaster whose "Oh my!" calls rang familiar with so many sports fans, has died, his wife and daughter confirmed Thursday night.

He was 82.

Enberg's daughter Nicole said the family became concerned when he didn't arrive on his flight to Boston on Thursday and that he was found dead at his home in La Jolla, a San Diego neighborhood, with his bags packed for a trip to see his third grandchild for the first time. The family said it was awaiting official word on the cause of death but believed he had a heart attack.

The family "is grateful for the kind thoughts and prayers of all of Dick's countless fans and dear friends," according to a statement released by Enberg's attorney, Dennis Coleman. "At this time we are all still processing the significant loss, and we ask for prayers and respectful privacy in the immediate aftermath of such untimely news."

Enberg was one of America's most beloved sports broadcasters, with his versatile voice spanning the world on networks such as NBC, CBS and ESPN. In all, he covered 28 Wimbledons, 10 Super Bowls and eight NCAA men's basketball title games, including the Magic Johnson-Larry Bird showdown in 1979.

His work was celebrated with a host of honors, including the National Baseball Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award (2015), the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Rozelle Award (1999) and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame's Gowdy Award (1995). He won 13 Sports Emmy Awards and a Lifetime Achievement Emmy. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and UCLA named its media center in Pauley Pavilion after Enberg this year.

Most recently, Enberg had served as the primary play-by-play television voice of the San Diego Padres, retiring in 2016 after seven seasons with the team.

"Baseball," he said then, "has been in my DNA from the time I was in diapers."

The Padres released a statement Thursday night.

"We are immensely saddened by the sudden and unexpected passing of legendary broadcaster Dick Enberg," the statement read. "Dick was an institution in the industry for 60 years and we were lucky enough to have his iconic voice behind the microphone for Padres games for nearly a decade. On behalf of our entire organization, we send our deepest condolences to his wife, Barbara, and the entire Enberg family."

Padres chairman Ron Fowler, who has known Enberg for more than 25 years, said Thursday night that the team has offered the family use of Petco Park for a celebration of his life.

Born and raised in Michigan, Enberg graduated from Central Michigan, where he began his broadcasting career as an undergraduate. He later moved to California, doing TV work for the UCLA Bruins and radio work for the California Angels and Los Angeles Rams.

During his nine years broadcasting UCLA basketball in the 1960s and '70s, the Bruins won eight NCAA titles. He said the Jan. 20, 1968, Houston-UCLA game, dubbed "The Game of the Century," in which the Bruins' 47-game winning streak was snapped in front of 52,693 fans at the Astrodome, was the most historically important event he covered. It was the first NCAA regular-season game broadcast nationwide in prime time.

"That was the platform from which college basketball's popularity was sent into the stratosphere," Enberg said. "The '79 game, the Magic-Bird game, everyone wants to credit that as the greatest game of all time. That was just the booster rocket that sent it even higher. ... UCLA, unbeaten; Houston, unbeaten. And then the thing that had to happen, and Coach [John] Wooden hated when I said this, but UCLA had to lose. That became a monumental event.''

In 1975, Enberg joined NBC Sports and remained with the network for 25 years, covering the World Series, NFL games and Wimbledon, among other sports and marquee events.

He went on to do work for CBS Sports and ESPN, with his voice commonly associated with the NFL and college basketball games, as well as the all-grass tennis tournament in England.

"All of us at CBS Sports are saddened to hear of the passing of our friend and colleague Dick Enberg," read a statement from Sean McManus, chairman of CBS Sports. "There will never be another Dick Enberg. As the voice of a generation of fans, Dick was a masterful storyteller, a consummate professional and a true gentleman. He was one of the true legends of our business. His passion, energy and love for the game will surely be missed. Our deepest sympathies go out to Barbara and his entire family."

An Enberg interview was published Thursday as part of his Sound of Success podcast. His guest was veteran TV producer and executive Andy Friendly. At one point in the extensive interview, Friendly paused to share his admiration for the legendary Enberg.

"I'm especially honored to be talking to you," he said. "I mean -- 'Oh my!' I grew up watching you do the NFL, especially Wimbledon. I was a tennis player growing up. ... I'm a golfer, a bad one now. ... And I just watched you religiously. ...

"This is a true honor, and I can't wait to read your book on Ted Williams, who is a true hero of mine.

"You are one of my true heroes and one of the true greats of our business, Dick. It's a real honor, and I'm not just blowing smoke, and I know your listeners know this already. I am talking to broadcast royalty today, and I am thrilled to be doing it."

Enberg is the only person to win Emmy Awards as a sportscaster, a writer and a producer.

His death comes just weeks shy of his 83rd birthday, which would have been on Jan. 9. He is survived by his wife, five children and three grandchildren.

ESPN's Dan Murphy and The Associated Press contributed to this report.
There you go making my heart beat again
Heart beat again, heart beat again
There you go making me feel like a kid
Won't you do it and do it one time
There you go pulling me right back in
Right back in, right back in
And I know I'm never letting this go
I'm stuck on you
Whoa-oh, whoa-oh

Vicki

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2017, 12:41:39 pm »
He had expertise in every sport he covered. From traditional 'guy' sports of football, baseball, and basketball all the way to tennis and gymnastics! The man knew sports! He will be missed. RIP Dick Enberg!
All women are lesbians at heart, my ongoing mission, to prove it.

Sanity is over-rated, but I never believed in it anyway. 

I'll make that top 10 posters list yet! :D

I can look at myself NAKED!

Founder of the Lesbian Lover's of the Multiverse

InThe313

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 11:10:31 am »
BOSTON -- Celtics legend Jo Jo White, a two-time NBA champion and Finals MVP, died Tuesday at age 71.

"My dad died from complications (pneumonia) from dementia that was brought on by the removal of a benign brain tumor in May 2010," his daughter, Meka White Morris, told *** **********.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of an incredible husband and father," White's family said in a statement. "He was a Hall Of Fame basketball player but an even better man. We sincerely appreciate all of the love and continued prayers, but we ask for privacy as we spend time as a family reflecting and celebrating his life."

White, a seven-time All-Star, averaged 17.2 points, 4.9 assists and 4.0 rebounds over 12 NBA seasons. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2015.

"We are terribly saddened by the passing of the great Jo Jo White," the Celtics said in a statement announcing White's passing. "He was a champion and a gentleman; supremely talented and brilliant on the court, and endlessly gracious off of it. Jo Jo was a key member of two championship teams, an NBA Finals MVP, a gold medal-winning Olympian, and a Hall of Famer. His contributions to the team's championship legacy may have only been surpassed by the deep and lasting impact that he had in the community. The thoughts and sympathies of the entire Celtics organization are with the White family."

White won a gold medal with the USA Olympic basketball team at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. The Celtics drafted him with the ninth overall pick in the 1969 draft out of Kansas.

While with the Jayhawks, White was a two-time All-American and was named the team's MVP for three consecutive seasons.

White, a 6-foot-3 point guard, won NBA titles with the Celtics in 1974 and 1976, earning Finals MVP honors in the latter. His No. 10 jersey was retired by Boston on April 9, 1982.

"Jo Jo White was a legend of our game. Two-time NBA champion, Finals MVP and Olympic gold medalist -- a model of consistent excellence and uncommon poise," NBA commissioner Adam Silver said in a statement. "He was a Hall of Fame player and an even bigger legend to countless people he inspired and communities he gave back to, especially in his longtime role as the Celtics' director of special projects. On behalf of the NBA family, I extend my deepest sympathies to Jo Jo's family and friends and the Celtics organization."

Former Boston guard Rajon Rondo, whose New Orleans Pelicans were in town to face the Celtics on Tuesday night, said White was one of the Celtics legends who made him feel most welcome during his time with the team.

"I knew [ White] pretty well. He was probably one of my biggest supporters from day one since I got here," Rondo said after his team's 116-113 win. "He always supported me. He always gave me great advice and his family, his wife, was very kind to me as well. I send my condolences to the White family."

White underwent life-threatening surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2010. With many vocal supporters, he earned induction into the Hall of Fame after a long wait in 2015 and gave a moving speech as part of the induction week where he reveled in the honor.

After 10 seasons in Boston, where he remains 10th on the franchise's all-time scoring list and holds the Celtics record with 488 consecutive games played, White finished his 12-season NBA career playing for Golden State and Kansas City.
There you go making my heart beat again
Heart beat again, heart beat again
There you go making me feel like a kid
Won't you do it and do it one time
There you go pulling me right back in
Right back in, right back in
And I know I'm never letting this go
I'm stuck on you
Whoa-oh, whoa-oh

Vicki

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Re: Sports figures deceased:
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2018, 10:23:10 pm »
Reports are that Edwin Jackson of the Colts has been killed by a drunk driver. I am sure more details will emerge.
All women are lesbians at heart, my ongoing mission, to prove it.

Sanity is over-rated, but I never believed in it anyway. 

I'll make that top 10 posters list yet! :D

I can look at myself NAKED!

Founder of the Lesbian Lover's of the Multiverse