Author Topic: Writing Guide  (Read 8555 times)

DirtyDoc

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Re: Writing Guide
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2012, 11:18:28 am »
I'd like to toss in my two cents.

There are more than two senses... make use of all five. - This can make the difference between a good story and a phenomenal story.  Remember that the human body get's its information from its environment.  Everyone pretty much has the sight and sound parts down... but what about the smell of your starlet's perfume?  The taste of her body?  The feel of her flesh?  Think about these questions, and your scenes become richer.

The environment is just as important as the people. - Where does your story take place?  What's the setting like?  Are there any breakable objects nearby?  What's the weather like outside?  If you think about the world around your participants, you might find that you can add some descriptors that take your story to the next level.  It's one thing to say that the sex was so hard that it blew their minds... but (IMO) it's much better to write something like, "As A and B rolled around in the throes of passion, they knocked the lamp on the bedside table onto the floor, which sent arcs of disconcerting shadows rampaging across the ceiling."  Likewise, the weather can play an important role in your story - you can talk about the sunlight streaming in through a window, or the crash of thunder rattling the windows (which startles A and causes them to jump into the arms of B, and the music swells, and their lips meet...)  The point is that you should not only think about your participants, but also the world in which they move.

Add some spearcarriers for flavoring. - Yes, the main character (or characters) are important and your story should focus on them.  But they also move through life encountering many people during the day with whom they will NOT get naked... what are their interactions like?  For example; A and B are going to hook up in a hotel room.  They might encounter the front-desk clerk, another couple in the elevator, and a maid with a cleaning cart in the hall before they hit the door to the room - all of these are opportunities to add some spice to the story.

That's all for now.  Have fun and keep writing!
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LL

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Re: Writing Guide
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2012, 01:32:42 pm »
A London Evening Paper (those who commute from the big smoke will know it) has just published an article on writing erotica, whilst lots of it is just the writers attempts to mix romance and sex into a story there's some comments at the end which fellow scribblers may find interesting

Quote
It’s part of the character development,” says Rice. “Sex scenes are like action scenes in a thriller. If it’s their first sexual encounter there will be lots of things that they don’t know each other that will be revealed — in their personalities, not what they look like naked.”

In my story, the two lovers fall for each other before the hero disappears without a word, only to reappear at the end for a steamy reunion. This, according to Rice, is a classic example of disastrously bad sex scene. “It’s just not believable,” she says. “You need to build up the sexual tension so that it’s believable.”

But my biggest mistake was a lack of character development.

“It’s all about the characters and if you don’t create characters people believe in then why would you care about what they get up to in the bedroom?” says Young.

I (loosely) based my synopsis on a true story, thinking it would make my characters more real, but apparently not.

“You need to develop your characters from the ground up. If you base them on real people, you don’t necessarily have an insight into their psyche,” says Rice.

“People ask a lot of questions about writing sex scenes but that isn’t the most important part of the process. Building your characters convincingly will give you convincing sex scenes.”

DirtyDoc

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Re: Writing Guide
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2012, 06:27:17 am »
Is the "Rice" who was quoted Anne Rice?  Just wondering, 'cause whenever I think about literary erotica my mind always turns first to her Beauty series.
[Topless Bimbo] - "Are you sure you're Martin Scorsese?"

[Voice Behind Camera] - "Sure, baby!"

From The Simpsons Ep. PABF01, "The Man in the Blue Flannel Pants"

LL

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Re: Writing Guide
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2012, 12:59:02 pm »
Is the "Rice" who was quoted Anne Rice?  Just wondering, 'cause whenever I think about literary erotica my mind always turns first to her Beauty series.

Heidi Rice, a prolific Mills and Boon Author

Full article is here


Quote
As she danced, Thea Chastain fixed her gaze on the double bassist on stage. “You definitely need to be big and dextrous to play that instrument,” she thought to herself. The man up there, with his arms wrapped around its body, was both.
 


Thea felt herself sinking into the music as she looked at him, his thick stubble and straight black hair, skimming his jawline, both matching the laid-back attitude of the jazz.

The deep thunk of the strings dominated as he played on, slapping and plucking the strings.

Oh dear, I’m cringing already — and I wrote it. That paragraph of trash and clichés was part of my attempt at a first chapter of a saucy novel for Mills & Boon — the publisher that puts out (so to speak) 100 romantic and erotic titles every month in e-book format and 60 a month in print.

You see, earning a quick million does have a certain appeal to it. And, in case you hadn’t noticed, there seems to be big money in sex. Not in having it, but in writing about it — because the best-selling novel of 2012 is full of it.

The Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy, about a naïve student meeting a billionaire businessman who likes to engage in bondage, discipline, sadism and masochism (BDSM), not only hit sales figures of 10 million copies last week (so many that the printers can’t keep up with demand), but after a bidding war, the film rights sold for $5 million.

And although it’s this particular series that has caused the biggest stir (and the biggest stirrings), the whole erotic fiction market is booming. Sales are up 30 per cent, according to reports, thanks to the advent of eReaders such as the Kindle — because as there are no book jackets, you can read the naughty bits undercover. 

Of course, this erotica boom has not gone unnoticed by the publishers, who are now mining the depths of online fan fiction sites, where the Fifty Shades trilogy first began, searching for new authors.

Indeed, Mills & Boon is so determined to find new writers that it is joining hands with modern technology (as all publishers must) and setting up “hangouts” — group VOIP calls — on the ****  social networking platform for virgin writers to get advice and feedback on their erotica/romance book proposals. All you have to do is show up online with a first chapter and a synopsis.  First up: me — and my character Thea Chastain, of course.

According to Mills & Boon, its writers can make anything from £2,000 to £30,000 per book in royalties, but it’s clear EL (Erika) James, the west London author of the Fifty Shades trilogy is raking it in — and she didn’t even mean to.

James originally posted the novel online as fan fiction based on the Twilight series. She told a US news channel that “never in a million years” had she expected its success. “It’s taken me by more than surprise,” she said. “I got an email about the film rights — I fell off my chair.”

So, if I could only come up with a good female character (let’s call her Thea, a small blonde, who is always falling in and out of love) a troubled hero (let’s give him a double life and make him play the double bass, to boot) and then have Thea fall for him because she likes the way he plays his instrument, then surely I could have the same success?

After all, we’re not talking Booker Prize stuff here — Fifty Shades is full of adverbs and exclamations. How hard can it be?

“I think a lot of people have misconceptions about how hard it is to write romantic fiction,” says Heidi Rice, a prolific Mills & Boon author, putting me in my place as soon as I join her and her editor, Kim Young, online for our new writer “hangout”.

Rice writes for Mills & Boon’s “Riva” genre, which combines sex and romance, but new authors also have the option can also write for the more erotic genres — called Blaze and Spice. “Romantic fiction gets a pretty raw deal. It’s always considered to be a very low genre, mostly I think because women read it and women write it,” she says. “It’s a difficult craft to learn and it’s a hard thing to get published in. A lot of people trying to write romantic fiction have never read any.”

Guilty as charged. I have dipped into Fifty Shades and read a couple of opening chapters but reading Mills & Boon has never been my thing.

As a result, I thought that sex on the first page would be taking things a little too far — so my first chapter was just slightly suggestive, but “in the Blaze genre, the first line could be the heroine giving the hero a blow job”, says editor Kim Young. “Not all sex has to be romantic and that’s a big mistake that new writers make.”

Nevertheless, the sex should not just be gratuitous.

“It’s part of the character development,” says Rice. “Sex scenes are like action scenes in a thriller. If it’s their first sexual encounter there will be lots of things that they don’t know each other that will be revealed — in their personalities, not what they look like naked.”

In my story, the two lovers fall for each other before the hero disappears without a word, only to reappear at the end for a steamy reunion. This, according to Rice, is a classic example of disastrously bad sex scene. “It’s just not believable,” she says. “You need to build up the sexual tension so that it’s believable.”

But my biggest mistake was a lack of character development.

“It’s all about the characters and if you don’t create characters people believe in then why would you care about what they get up to in the bedroom?” says Young.

I (loosely) based my synopsis on a true story, thinking it would make my characters more real, but apparently not.

“You need to develop your characters from the ground up. If you base them on real people, you don’t necessarily have an insight into their psyche,” says Rice.

“People ask a lot of questions about writing sex scenes but that isn’t the most important part of the process. Building your characters convincingly will give you convincing sex scenes.”

My erotica millions won’t be flooding in just yet.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2012, 01:21:06 pm by Victor »

Sara Violet

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Re: Writing Guide
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2012, 06:07:57 am »
I'd like to add...

Just Write
A badly written story is better than no story. This is part of Uwe Boll's philosophy and look how far it got him. ;D There'll always be someone who appreciates something in it (in theory). Unless your story is incomprehensible (in which case keep practicing). The human race does need to be able to understand it, or it would be modern poetry instead. ;D