Author Topic: Writing Guide  (Read 8554 times)

The Squad Leader

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Writing Guide
« on: June 26, 2009, 04:48:45 pm »
Hey everyone, it's The Squad Leader here.

I decided to post this writing guide in the hopes that it will inspire new authors to start writing and/or give some tips to existing authors.

Right now, it is just a basic skeleton of some ideas off of the top of my head, but my hope is that some of the experienced writers around here will modify anything that is a bit unclear and add some tips of their own to what I've got so far so that we've got a really cool guide to erotic writing that anyone can check out.

Now get out there and start writing those stories newbies and keep up the good work vets!


TIPS FOR EROTIC WRITING

SECTION I - INSPIRATION

1. Write what you want to see -
It’s as simple as that.  No one else knows exactly what you want to see your favorite celebs doing better than you. You can make requests to other authors all you want, but if you really want to see something specific, take a crack at it yourself.

2.   Jot down your ideas –This is especially important when it comes to writing a series. Take all of the scenarios that run through your head and just jot them down. That’s what is so brilliant about creative writing is that you can find a way to work every twisted thought you have into a series.

3.   Don’t force it – If you get to a point where the creative juices just aren’t flowing or writing a story is becoming a chore, walk away for a while and come back to it when the mood strikes you. If you’re not having fun writing it, it will definitely show.

4.   Don’t get discouraged –Becoming a good writer doesn’t always happen overnight. You may look back at your early stories and cringe, but don’t give up. Take the things you like and keep them and change what you don’t like the next time around. And just remember that you are always going to be your worst critic. The story might not be as bad as you think.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2009, 05:02:33 pm by The Squad Leader »
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The Squad Leader

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2009, 04:53:14 pm »
SECTION II. – INTRODUCTION

1. Build the tension –
   This step, in my opinion is what makes or breaks a good erotic story. One of the things that makes reading these type of stories enjoyable to the average reader is the buildup of tension. Whether it’s flirting or arguing or some other kind of character interaction, this is the stuff that makes it so much more erotic when the characters finally do get together.  I’m not saying that you have to write a novel, but give the reader a reason to really get invested in the characters.

2. Not too short, not too long –As I said above, you don’t want to skimp on adding tension to the story, but at the same time you don’t want to add so much plot that the reader gets bogged down and skips down to the sex scenes. Remember what they’re ultimately reading it for and plan accordingly. Of course ultimately you should tell the story you want to tell but if you can streamline it, all the better. It is a bit of a tightrope to walk but practice makes perfect.  

3. Set the mood –I personally like to keep my stories light and fun, but try to set the mood that you want to establish. Sprinkling in a little bit of campy humor is one of the ways I set the mood for my stories. Another way to set the mood is to describe in detail some otherwise irrelevant object such as a table in the room or the clock on the wall or a minor character. It may sound silly at first, but it really helps the reader feel like they are there and adds to the eroticism.
Paradise, has it's hunter
Call me blind, call me fool
I don't mind chasing thunder
I say reaching for heaven is what I'm on Earth to do

-Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - Dear Believer

The Squad Leader

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2009, 04:55:51 pm »
SECTION III – CHARACTERIZATION

1. Establish who they are –
Remember, this is fantasyland. If you want to write Jessica Simpson as a complete bitch and Eliza Dushku as the sweet girl next door, you can do it. All it takes is a few lines to convey to the reader what type of personality they have.

2.   Bait and switch – Once you’ve established the personality of your character the real fun begins. You can take a celeb that you’ve established as a “good girl” and have her become a complete wildcat in the sack. Or you can keep their character consistent throughout. That’s one of the great things about this type of writing, you are only bound by your own imagination.

3.   Let us hear their thoughts – Another very simple way to build tension and establish character is to simply tell us what is going on in their heads. A simple line like (“Oh my God, I could never do that…..could I?” Lucy thought.) goes a long way. You’re able to convey inner conflict and again that builds the erotic tension.
Paradise, has it's hunter
Call me blind, call me fool
I don't mind chasing thunder
I say reaching for heaven is what I'm on Earth to do

-Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - Dear Believer

The Squad Leader

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2009, 04:58:53 pm »
SECTION IV – WRITING THE SEX SCENES

1. Build up to a climax –
Pacing is extremely important in the sex scenes themselves. For the most part, you don’t want to hit the ground running or the reader will quickly lose interest. Just like in real life, you should start with the foreplay and gradually work your way up to the crazy, sweaty, screaming monkey sex.

2.   Don’t use your whole bag of tricks on every scene – Just because you like to write about anal sex for example, doesn’t mean that you have to add it into every scene you write. If the characters do the same thing in every scene, you will most likely burn yourself out on writing quickly. I’m not saying not to write what you want to see, I’m just saying to maybe save that anal scene for your favorite girl or a special scene that really excites you.

3.   Dirty talk is your friend – There are only so many ways to have sex and only so many words for cock and pussy so eventually you are going to start sounding repetitive to yourself. This is where dirty talk comes in to play. In between describing what the characters are doing, have them talking to one another.  Not only is it hot, but it breaks up the action enough so that the sex doesn’t read like an instruction manual (Insert Rod A into Twat B.)

4.   Keep it fun – Real life is boring man. When I write a sex scene, I like to imagine that every girl has multiple explosive orgasms and that they all love every manner of freaky sex. Obviously this isn’t true in real life, but again this is all make believe anyway, so of course it should be fun.

SECTION V - GRAMMAR TECHNIQUES

1. Always have someone proofread -
Poor grammar can derail an otherwise promising story. Whenever possible, see if you can find an author on the board or someone you trust to proofread it for you. If you can't find a person, most programs have a built in spelling and grammar check function.

2. Strike a balance -Find a nice balance of writing for a mature audience and avoiding six syllable words that the average reader has never heard of.

3. Repetition bad, metaphors good - Try to avoid using the same words over and over (especially within the same sentence.) As mentioned earlier, there are only so many words for cock and pussy but mixing them up every once in a while is a good thing. Also, a few metaphors can be very descriptive and help the reader feel like they are in the story. Ex- "Her nipples were jutting out like little party hats."

4. Try to avoid the word then - It is very boring to read something like "Then she took off her clothes, then they kissed some more, then he put his cock inside of her."

Much better to say something like "I need you inside of me right now." She moaned as he hungrily tore the rest of her clothes off. Brandon could see the desire in her eyes and taste the passion on her lips and finally, when he knew that she was overcome with lust, gently eased his cock inside of her awaiting pussy.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 10:30:17 am by The Squad Leader »
Paradise, has it's hunter
Call me blind, call me fool
I don't mind chasing thunder
I say reaching for heaven is what I'm on Earth to do

-Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - Dear Believer

The Squad Leader

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2009, 05:00:32 pm »
SECTION VI – AFTER THE STORY IS DONE

1. To get feedback, you should give some –
After you’ve written a story, it is human nature to want to know what everyone else thought about it. But remember, just because you don’t get much feedback at first, that doesn’t mean that people didn’t enjoy the story. It takes a lot sometimes for a person to take the time to e-mail you or post their thoughts but don’t get discouraged. The best way for you to get feedback is to share your thoughts with the other authors about their stories. That way, they are more inclined to give you their thoughts.

2.   Don’t take negative feedback personally – Not every story is another person’s cup of tea. If someone is offering you some constructive criticism, don’t get your feelings hurt. Listen to what they are saying and decide if you agree or not. On the rare occasion that someone offers non-constructive criticism, it is best to just ignore it.

3. Be your own advocate - Don't be afraid to hype up a story you've written. Let people know what you're working on to get them excited. And don't be afraid to nominate a story you wrote yourself when it comes time for the CSSA awards if you think it is worthy. With so many stories out there it is easy for one to get overlooked when it first comes out.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 10:14:23 am by The Squad Leader »
Paradise, has it's hunter
Call me blind, call me fool
I don't mind chasing thunder
I say reaching for heaven is what I'm on Earth to do

-Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - Dear Believer

Rob_Leung

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2009, 07:27:37 pm »
Thanks alot for this thread! It helps us new writers so much!

So many thanks, much appreciated

Rob

The Squad Leader

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2009, 08:16:53 pm »
You are very welcome. Hopefully it will become even more helpful as everyone contributes to it. And I look forward to reading your stories if you decide to give it a crack.

The Squad Leader
« Last Edit: June 26, 2009, 08:20:50 pm by The Squad Leader »
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I don't mind chasing thunder
I say reaching for heaven is what I'm on Earth to do

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2009, 08:34:16 pm »
Let me just say that with these rules, anyone can become an author, they only need to find the courage to do so and with Squad Leader's guide to writing, this could really help new folks to become authors. I read a few stories from all three sites and saw promising chances with newbies or newbs in short term. All I gotta say is this... Don't be afraid to use this guide every so often. I'm also guessing that this guide does not only include CSSA authors but for both TSSA and WOWEFA? Even so, anyone that reads from any site can use this guide to help with their writing. With that, I say good luck to anyone who might use this guide to help with their writing.

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« Last Edit: June 26, 2009, 09:17:44 pm by Helper_V.2 »
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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2009, 02:29:18 am »
Thank you for taking a moment to provide this guide.

CanisLupus

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2009, 02:39:19 am »
This is a great idea Squad Leader :thumbsup:
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LL

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2009, 06:06:46 am »
Good guide - I'll add some of my own

Make use of grammar,
Don't repeat words in the same sentence;
English is a language of grandeur - write for adults not eight year olds;
Don't include words no-one has heard of just to appear clever;
Avoid using 'then'
Metaphors and similes- use them unless you're writing a biology textbook


But remember 'Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the obedience of fools'




[EDIT - Leave the definition of whats erotic to the writer and reader.  V.]
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 07:20:05 am by Victoria »

The Squad Leader

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2009, 10:30:57 am »
I added your tips to the guide LL. Thanks!

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Call me blind, call me fool
I don't mind chasing thunder
I say reaching for heaven is what I'm on Earth to do

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2009, 04:09:50 pm »
Great tips!
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Rich Wilson

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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2010, 07:08:51 am »
For what it’s worth - my advice on writing:

Write every single day – The most important thing any writer can do, the most obvious thing for any writer to do, and yet the one most don’t do. The more you write, the better you’ll become at it. It is that simple. Even if you can only crank out 100 words a day it’s good for the mind and the skills. After a while, if you really are a writer, you’ll find that those words come easier, and that you actually crave the time alone at the laptop with your world of fantasy. And if the work becomes a chore… well, maybe it’s time you thought of doing something else.

Read every single day – To me it’s as important as doing the writing. Submerging yourself in other fiction WILL be an inspiration to your own. I’m currently reading Boneshaker by Cherie Priest, and every chapter is filling my head with ideas and making me want to write a steampunk story. I’ve just read Lush Life by Richard Price and I wanted to write a New York cop thriller, and the way Price crafts dialogue made me realise how far I have to go. It’s also inspired me to do better. Writers read – constantly.

Censor – So write your story/article/whatever, save it, and put it aside for a while. Give it a week and then come back to it. Now, along with your spell checking and grammar fixing, start the editing process. Did you really need that half page description of how wonderful the Chicago skyline looked? Were her eyes really “as blue as the ocean”? Don’t be afraid to chop bits away from your baby. Yes it hurts, because we cherish every word we write for the accomplishment that it is. But the truth is this - every line isn’t a masterpiece. Trim the fat and it will taste better.

Do it out of love – Anyone who get’s into writing for money or accolades is woefully misguided. There isn’t any money. Once upon a time there was billions of dollars/pounds available to writers. And then J.K.Rowling came up with the idea of that teenage wizard and she ran away with it all. Very few writers make much money. And don’t write in the hope that people are going to kiss your arse and tell you how wonderful your work is. Most of them won’t give a shit, and even fewer of them will bother to read it. Writing is a solitary business that alienates you from friends and family for hours at a time, frequently causes headaches and stress, is often frustrating and gives you a permanent crease in your brow. Really, there’s not a lot going for it… But, if you do it, a moment will come, maybe at 2.45am when your back is aching and your eyes are streaming after hours hunched over your screen, when the words start to flow smoothly, when your characters start to breathe independently, and when as a writer you’re just along for the ride, surprised at what just happened because the work has taken on a life of it’s own…

That’s what makes it all worthwhile.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2010, 09:24:43 am by Rich Wilson »
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Re:Writing Guide
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2010, 01:36:12 am »
Keep track of her and she.

This is a very important rule that I constantly struggle with and I see a lot of stumbling over this in the (mostly lesbian) stories I read. Whenever you have more than one women in a scene you're going to have an awful lot of she and her, and it very easily gets confusing who you are refering to. Make sure that you go over every sentence and make sure that it makes sense. Few things can grind the reading to a halt like confusion about who is doing what.